Tag: Facebook

The Most Exclusive Page on Facebook

A not so long time ago social media campaigns equaled Facebook likes. This have changed quickly, both brands and agencies understand that a like in itself isn’t worth anything. It’s how you use that like and how people interact with your brand that’s interesting.

The like isn’t forgotten; it’s measured in countless case movies and still has its place. It’s just not in the spotlight as it used too. CP+B took this to their hearts and created a Facebook campaign that was the complete opposite to all previous ones.

The Most Exclusive Page of Facebook

This is the Facebook page for the Grey Poupon mustard brand. Getting into the club isn’t easy. You have to pass a test of taste. An app will scan your Facebook likes to see if you have good enough taste to be a Grey Poupon fan. You can like the page without doing the test, but you’ll be thrown out within 24 hours.

I think this is brilliant. Exclusivity is desirable and in a universe where brands pay people to like them, Grey Poupon is doing the opposite. It’s a remarkably simple way to stand out. And who wouldn’t want to be seen as someone with great taste?

Silver + Partners, wow!

Your first love is always special. It’s likely that it won’t feel as good the second time, it’ll still be love but you’ve built up a tolerance of sort. Apparently that is not true for me when I fall for ad agencies. I haven’t felt like this in a year, when I found the works of Dare’s Vancouver office.
Now I have found something in the Big Apple. The agency isn’t big, but the ideas and concepts are.

Ben & Jerry’s
These campaigns have a hard focus on social media and small budgets. But the use of both Twitter and Facebook is phenomenal.

Fairtweets –Twitter

I think this is a very clever idea. I don’t usually like ideas that can work on a number of brands. But in this case I don’t see that problem. Instead I’m envious of the guys who came up with this idea. Being first at an idea that could’ve worked for a number of charitable organizations. I think that’s something impressive, especially when the idea is as good as this.

Wanna spoon? – Facebook

It’s a very clever insight about how Facebook campaigns should work. What I like so much about this campaign is that it’s actually social. It’s not just a clever viral ad and a “share on Facebook”-button attached. This is a campaign that helps you connect to lost friends. It’s not focused on mass sharing, but the one-on-one sharing, which of course eventually leads to mass sharing – but it’s not the focus. Ben & Jerry’s helps you start a dialogue with old friends. Branding themselves not so much as a cool brand, but a brand that’s involved in and care about their customers’ relationships.

CarMax – Super Bowl TV-spots

The top one is my favorite, easy choice. It’s visual, nicely edited and every time the camera cuts I chuckle a little. But the second ad is not as good. On the idea/concept level it was probably as good as the first. I think it’s clever, it gets the point across, but the actor is neither fun nor believable. All the ingredients are all there but something’s wrong with the recipe.

Ultimat Vodka
The guerilla ad for this brand got a huge media spread. But the same insight was also used for prints, outdoor and banners. It’s also cool to see how differently the tone of voice is compared to the CarMax ads. They’re both humorous and from the same agency but hits completely different target groups.

Window Cleaner – Guerilla/Event/Real Life Interaction

If your target group is rich people who work all the time, you know where to find them – at the top floors. So if they won’t come to you, why not go to them? Point out their lack of social life, and how little they see their family. Show your brand as a solution, the balancer of their life.

Get Offline – Banners

Banners are a hard medium to work in, the formats are weird if you’re used to print or TV and no one seem to notice them. So for a banner to be visible, there has to be an idea. Something that can catch us off guard, there is no other way past banner blindness. And I think the rich-media-use in this ad does just that. It’s the greatest display ad I’ve seen since I first saw Zappos streaker. But this ad have a harder task, it’s confined within that small box and can’t run all over the place. Big props on the media buy as well, bullseye on strategy.

The campaign also came with print ads, and tbh… these are kind of harsh, but I still like them. It hits you were it hurts, but also offers a solution (of sort) to your problem.

From what I can find at AdAge, the agency is 35 employees small. So thank all of you at Silver + Partners, you turned the start of my week into a weirdly emotional one. Filled with a mix of envy and adoration. This is the type of advertising I want and hope to do in my future career.

It’s time for Droga5 to show you why I love them.

Mel the Milkbite

I’m starting out with a campaign that I love. It’s cute and funny. But it’s also a smart way of marketing the product.

This spot was bashed for racism. I understand why people found it racist, but I can’t really agree. You can read a lot into this commercial if you’d like to. How deep racism still runs in the world – some still won’t date people with another ethnicity.

But does that make the ad racist? Definitely not. It takes the issue of being a mix, or not knowing who you really are, and puts it in another perspective. That’s not racist, there’s nothing here that says that X is better than Y. It just says that she’s only into X, until she actually meets the X+Y combination.

You might say that it simplifies a big issue and mocks it. I say: what’s wrong with bringing these issues out into the light? Especially when a big corporation pays for it. I’m sure this ad actually started conversations about Internet dating and prejudice. A commercial did that. That’s a very good thing!

Decode Jay-Z

This is probably Droga5’s most famous campaign. It won too many awards to name them all but the list includes: a golden Cannes Lion in Direct, one Grand Prix in Outdoor and another in Integrated, a One Show Gold in Outdoor.

The campaign wasn’t the first to use this technology. But it’s the biggest integrated campaign ever. It’s spread out over the world, not in a single city or even a country, the world.

But what makes this campaign so freaking cool is the media buys: pool table mats, fast food soda cups, luxury jacket linings etc. This was an expensive campaign no doubt, but it’s also cool to see a global brand like Microsoft spend their money on it. No doubt was this a gamble, but they really went all in. Thank you for that. Now all we want are global brands doing the same thing.

The above campaigns were both from the New York office, so lets take a look down under. The following two campaigns were made by Droga5’s Sydney office.

Facebook intervention

Many Facebook campaigns are just about likes. Some campaigns have taken it further, like take this lollipop. But that can get a bit scary. So how do you use the same technology but for something fun? And how do you make people connect to each other with it instead of themselves.


Case study here (couldn’t be embeded).

This is what you do when your friends become total Facebook posers. You give them an intervention. I think it’ll be hard to see how many beers this campaign actually sold. But in the long run this is the kind of ad that’ll make people like your brand. Few things are as powerful for marketing as people actually liking your brand.

The strongest and most loved brands don’t have to fight their battles and try to get likes. People will do it for them, and if your product isn’t good or different enough this is one of the ways to earn that love. Fun, integrated campaigns that fit your target group perfectly. A beer brand spoofed young men on the Internet = perfect match.

Raise a glass

This is another campaign for the beer brand VB. But if you’re not a total cynical you’ll have to press the tears back rather than laugh.

I am a bit of a cynical and I don’t like brands to free ride on people’s deaths. But I don’t think this does. The campaign is focused on remembering lost soldiers. Honoring them with a raised glass, and gathered money for the ones left behind. It’s a lovable campaign and the greatest part is that it’ll be permanent.

Raise a glass shows that brands can do great things. They’re not all evil corporations. Even if VB makes money on this I don’t think that’s their main reason. If it were, it wouldn’t have worked as great as it did.

Good use of social media

TBWA Belgium created this nice social media campaign for BMW mini. If you were the person to break the rope, you won the car.

I like the campaign because if I like the Mini fan page, I get something back. I get a chance to win a car. There’s something in it for me, more than just posts promoting the company. I’m so tired of all the companies who don’t get social media.

All the time I see ridiculous usage of social media in ads. The most common one is to add a “like us on Facebook” / “Follow us on Twitter” messages in ads. This is only OK on the web, where you can actually create straight links to the sites. But even then it’s LAME to beg for likes… If a normal person would do this they would be considered: stupid, desperate and lame. A company will be seen the same way.

But there are worse cases. When companies hide content from you – till you like them, the perfect way to lose potential customers. All I want is to check you out and see what you’re about. But if you can’t even give that away for free, why would I want to buy something from you?